Patrick Carroll | Works
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The Inn at the Crossroad – Ten – Requiescant In Pace

The following will be a survey of those hostelries recorded at one time or another as existing in Crewkerne, and which are now no more.  Some have been gone for many years, or even centuries; but others are recent enough to be well-remembered by current Crewkerne residents and, indeed, five of the older houses were operating during my own time...

The Inn at the Crossroad – PART TWO – Nine – The Competition

The following are historical sketches of Crewkerne's other older inns, both those still in existence, and the ones that are no more.  Since I first undertook these researches Crewkerne, like the rest of the country, has seen some dramatic attrition affecting the town's inns.  When I last revised the list there were ten establishments that were at least 100 years...

The Inn at the Crossroad – Eight – In Living Memory

In looking back and revising the eighth chapter of this study I've been given pause as to retaining the title "In Living Memory".  My reason for this - not surprisingly after a hiatus of nearly 20 years - is that at least three of my previous informants have since gone under the wire.  However, I have reflected that those individuals...

Helstonia – The Rodney Inn, Meneage Street, Helston

  The Rodney Inn is named for George Brydges Rodney, 1st Baron Rodney of Rodney Stoke, Somerset.  Rodney was perhaps the most celebrated naval hero of the mid-18th century.  Born in 1718 and baptised at Walton-on-Thames in February of that year, his family were well-connected but became comparatively impoverished following his father’s loss of a substantial portion of his wealth through...

Helstonia – The Bell Inn, Meneage Street

Paul Corballis in his book Pub Signs (Lennard Publishing 1988) writes “…if you see a pub with this sign look around for a church.  This ancient sign originated with pubs attached to or near early churches.”  It is possible that there was in pre-Reformation times an ecclesiastical establishment of some kind on or adjacent to the present Meneage Street site of the Bell...

The Shakespeare Tavern, Prince Street, Bristol

 “After God, Shakespeare has created most” - Alexander Dumas   Bristol boasts four inns named in honour of the Swan of Avon.  The one now at 68 Prince Street owes its name to the proximity of the Theatre Royal, Britain’s oldest purpose-built playhouse, in more or less continuous use since 1766. The present Shakespeare Tavern comprises half of a double-fronted, stone-built house dating from...

Helstonia – The Cornish Hotels of New York City

THE CORNISH HOTELS OF NEW YORK CITY PART ONE Some time ago, while researching in the Cornish Studies Library at Redruth into the history of an old Cornish public house, I encountered on microfilm copies of the West Briton newspaper’s shipping columns dating from the 1890s a series of advertisements connecting the area of Lower Manhattan where I spent my childhood and...

Helstonia – Two More Coinagehall Street Hostelries

  The Seven Stars Inn – AKA Fitzsimmons Arms From its inception until c.1982 the house was known as the Seven Stars Inn.  For a 25 year period during the 1980s, ‘90s and into the present century the house was known by the sign of the Fitzsimmons Arms.  In the middle ages the Seven Stars was a religious sign, representing the seven...

The Old Punter’s Cautionary Tale of a Ditty

The Old Punter’s Cautionary Tale of a Ditty - The History of "Dublin Lady" I might have followed the example of Noel Coward when he warned “Don’t Put Your Daughter on the Stage, Mrs. Worthington” in advising my children against becoming songwriters. As it is, in the case of my eldest son, the counsel would have come too late.  He’s already...

Seamus Ennis, Sketch of a Master

My admiration for Seamus Ennis – always fairly idolatrous – reached its peak one night in March 1971 at Thurso Folk Club.  Seamus, the Scotish folk singer/songwriter Archie Fisher and I had driven from Aberdeen; stopping only for a flat tyre in Dingwall, and making the last hundred miles in a slithery drizzle along a serpentine coast road, stretches of...